December 16

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Be hungry for impact, not applause

December 16, 2020


Dear Singer,

In our Tik-Tok obsessed, Insta-famous world, it's easy to fall into the trap of being hungry for applause. Don't get us wrong - applause feels great. It's flattering to have a room full of people clapping and even cheering in response to your singing, or to get a bunch of likes on a video you posted. Applause provides valuable and deserved encouragement for singers, and there's nothing wrong with graciously accepting the gratitude and praise of your audience. The problem comes when applause is your primary motivation for singing.

We want so much more for you than for you to be driven by the approval of other people. After all, applause will eventually fade, and there will always be someone behind you ready to take your place as a crowd favourite. Audiences are fickle and their praise is fleeting, and if that's why you sing, eventually you're going to be disappointed.

Don't be hungry for applause. Instead, be hungry for impact. Be the singer who people remember because of how you made them feel - the moment of incredible beauty they experienced in your performance, or the way your message gave them the courage to persevere through a tough situation. Help people forget the problems that await them at home, at work or at school, and in that brief moment when you captivate their attention, give them permission to laugh, cry, and hope, and help them remember what it's like to live with the innocent belief that the world is in fact a beautiful place and that humans are fundamentally decent.

When you choose to serve your audience with your voice and give them the gift of a transcendent moment rather than expecting them to serve you with their applause, everything changes. Your attitude to practice changes, because you understand the importance of bringing your best to serve others. Your song choice is no longer about what best showcases you (though we definitely advocate for song selections that sit within your zone of creative genius!), but about understanding who your audience are and how you can best help them. Even your interactions with tech crew and venue staff are guided by a sense of service and teamwork, not the desire to inflate your own ego.

Being hungry for applause might get you places, and you might even end up a household name. But if you stand on stage seeking adoration and attention for yourself, the only life you'll truly impact, is your own. Imagine how more lives you'll change by being hungry for impact instead.

Dare to be extraordinary,
Tim & Lauren

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